7 Unusual Statues And Monuments Across The Globe!

There are some monuments and statues that instill a sense of pride, beauty or emotions among the viewer. Those are unforgettable pieces of art that you get to see on field trips or in the pages of history books. But then there are some less-explored monuments, which are in a way an ode to the weird, the wonderful, and the just plain wacky which would make you think, “Seriously Bro? Seriously? Were you high or something before you ended up making these?”

Let’s look at some of them, One cautionary advice would be to just enjoy the view instead of trying to understand them (not if you don’t have something better to do).

7. De Vaartkapoen

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Pic Courtesy : https://www.pinterest.com/pin/393572454909693397/

This statue was erected in 1985 in the Molenbeek area of Brussels. The scene it depicts is reminiscent of a comedy sketch: a man unexpectedly emerges from a manhole and pulls the feet from underneath a policeman. It’s author is Belgian sculptor Tom Frantzen.

6. Shit Fountain

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Pic Courtesy : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Hr3jYKvydY

Artist Jerzy Kenar got tired of stepping out of his Chicago home and constantly stepping in dog poop. So, he decided to put his talents to good use and created a visual monument that would serve as a reminder to the dog owners of the neighborhood to scoop up what their pups leave behind. Enter Shit Fountain, a fecal-shaped bronze coil on top of a cement pillar with the monument’s title carved into the side.

5. The Headington Shark

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Pic Courtesy: http://armchairtravelogue.blogspot.in/2010/04/headington-shark-which-survived-attack.html

The significance of this sculpture is much greater than may appear at first sight. It was erected on the 41st anniversary of the nuclear attack on Nagasaki at the end of World War II. The sculpture depicts a beautiful , if potentially deadly lethal weapon falling from the sky.

4. Die Badende

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Pic Courtesy: http://www.panoramio.com/photo/56875945

Artist Oliver Voss created the sculpture as an advertisement for British beauty company Glory. The company wanted to make a “big splash” in thanking the German people for embracing their latest line of products. The advertisement proved very successful; customers and a large crowd gathered to watch the woman hoisted from the water. The movers had a large towel ready to conceal her lady bits from peeping eyes.

3. Jimmy Carter Peanut

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Photo credit: National Park Service

The Jimmy Carter Peanut might give you nightmares, standing at 4 meters (13 ft) tall with a wide, toothy smile and no eyes. The peanut can be found on the side of the road in Plains, Georgia. The structure started out far from Georgia, however. It was actually constructed in Indiana in 1976 to honor Jimmy Carter’s visit to the state during his presidential campaign tour. Why was a giant, smiling peanut, of all things, used as a tribute? Well, before he was president, Carter was actually a peanut farmer.

2. Jeju Loveland

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Pic Courtesy: http://thetravellingsquid.com/2017/01/08/sexciting-visit-to-the-jeju-loveland/img_0951/

The salacious monuments found on Jeju Island in South Korea were made to honor sexual acts. The park itself is called Jeju Loveland and arouses more than just curiosity from its many visitors. The theme park opened in 2004 and has a collection of more than 140 erotic statues depicting sexual encounters between both humans and animals. The goals of the theme park are to break down barriers and taboo feelings surrounding sex and promote the “natural beauty of sexuality.”

1. Brownnosers

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Pic Courtesy: https://www.trover.com/d/rZqN-futura-gallery-%C4%8Dernys-brown-nosers-prague-czech-republic

Brownnosers, created by Czech artist David Cerny, takes the term “brownnoser” to an entirely new (and literal) level. The two statues stand, or rather bend over, outside the Futura Gallery in Prague. The two figures are positioned side-by-side with the lower portions of their torsos protruding from a cement wall. Viewers are invited to climb ladders attached to the open anuses of the figures and stick their heads inside the openings.

Featured Pic Courtesy : http://www.siteadvisor.com
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Lesser known Harvest Festivals of India

India is a land of festivities and various different festivals are celebrated. Being the colorful nation that India is, the most vibrant harvest festivals of India involve interesting mythological legends and joyous celebrations. They are incredible and diverse just like its people and landscapes and let’s one experience the beauty of the Indian culture.

Some of the lesser knowns of these harvest festivals are :

Jallikattu also known as eru thazhuvuthal and manju virattu, is one of those traditional spectacles(started from about 100 BC) in which a Pulikulam or Kangayam bull is released into a crowd of people, and multiple human participants attempt to grab the large hump on the bull’s back with both arms and hang on to it while the bull attempts to escape. Participants are supposed to hold onto the hump for as long as possible, in an attempt to bring the bull to a stop. In some cases, participants must ride long enough to remove flags on the bull’s horns.

Image Source: youthkiawaaz.com

 

Pulikkali originated from the state of Kerala as a recreational folk art. It is performed by trained artists to entertain people on the occasion of Onam, an annual harvest festival. The fourth day of Onam witnesses (Nalaam Onam) where performers painted like tigers and hunters in bright yellow, red, and black dance to the beats of instruments like Udukku and Thakil. The literal meaning of Pulikkali is the ‘play of the Tigers’ hence the performance revolves around the theme of tiger hunting. The origin of Pulikkali dates back to over 200 years when  Maharaja Thampuran od Cochin is said to have introduced the folk art, who wanted to celebrate Onam with a dance that reflected the wild and macho spirit of the force.

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Image Source:  http://www.arnabmaity.com/2013/01/experiencing-onam-at-thrissur-keralas-cultural-capital-all-about-grand-meals-and-giant-tummies.html

 

Madai festival is one festival originating from Chhattisgarh. The festival reflects the rich culture and tradition of the state, celebrated by the Gond Tribe from the month of December to March and tours from one place of the state to another.  The local tribes of the state along with other communities worship the presiding deity during the festival. The tribal people of Chhattisgarh launch a procession in the beginning on an open field where a large number of devotees and general tourists gather to witness the rituals, followed by the Puja ceremony where the priest or similar figure starts worshiping the goddess. When the worshiping finishes, several cultural events like folk dance, drama, songs etc. start taking place in the open space.

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Image Source: https://htoindia.com/blog/madai-festival-tribal-event-full-fun-joy/

 

Mim Kut Festival is a post-harvest festival celebrated in Nagaland and also in parts of Mizoram by the Kuki Nagas. It is one of the many popular festivals of Nagaland. It expresses exhilaration and triumphant over the harvest of Mim (Maize), which is the last harvest crop for the season. The Kuki people hold strong belief that the souls of their deceased ancestors rise from their graves and visit their family homes. The people offer tribute to the dead souls in form of wine that is naturally prepped from rice at every home. These dead souls are also worshiped by the villagers. The Mim Kut festival like most festivals of Nagas includes tradition singing, dancing, playing musical instruments and proud display of culture.

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Image Source: netourism.shillong.com

 

Vautha Fair originating from Gujarat is one where tens of thousands of donkeys, as well as hundreds of camels, adorned in an array of colors and bright embellishments, are brought where they are traded on the fairgrounds at the Sangam tirtha. For some, this place is as divine as the Sangam in Allahabad, while many communities consider this fair even more important than Diwali. This is the meeting place of seven holy rivers: the Vatrak merges with the Meshwo, Hathmati, Shedhi, Majum, and Khari before it then meets the Sabarmati, so the locals call it Saptasangam (i.e. the meeting of seven).

Vautha Fair

Image Source: dainikbhaskar.com

 

These were a few. If the same tingles your inquisitive self then follow the link for more https://traveltriangle.com/blog/harvest-festivals-of-india/.

Image Source Of Featured Pic: fantasticpixcool